Online course October 2017 to June 2018

Online course in mindfulness of breathing to develop calm

www.online-buddhist-meditation.org

The 2017-2018 course started on Saturday October 14th.

While it is best to learn this practice by attending a local class, many people may not be within reach of such a class. We therefore also provide   an online class, taught by Peter Harvey and a small group of other teachers, using written and recorded material that Peter developed over many years in teaching traditional face-to-face classes. This is supplemented by online written discussions. The aim is to have a group of people reflectively learning the practice, stage by stage, together, as in a non-online class.

A particular feature of this online class is that each meditator will have weekly one-to-one discussions using the Skype free video-link, with Peter or another teacher, about how their practice is going.

The course beins on October 9th and runs through to the end of June. Participants can download a week's teachings at any time during a week, and will arrange a convenient time for their one-to-one Skype discussion.

To register an interest, contact Peter Harvey: b.peter.harvey@gmail.com When doing this, please say what country you are based in. Where this is the UK, Ireland or the USA, where there are existing Samatha classes, please also include county or state. Please also indicate whether you already do, or have done, a meditation practice, and if so, of what type. While no previous experience is necessary, it is helpful to know what experience people may have.

To download the introduction to the guide written for the online course, see button on the right.

The Samatha Trust is happy to acknowledge that Peter Harvey is a teacher of meditation within the tradition of practice initiated in the UK by Nai Boonman Poonyathiro in the 1960s, which is now taught in classes across the UK, in the USA, in Ireland and elsewhere. At the same time, both the Trust and Peter would wish to make clear that neither these writings, nor any others, are to be regarded as a  ‘definitive’ expression of this tradition . They represent one person’s experience and understanding which he has chosen to make available to others in this way.